The species and changes in these lists have all been reported in peer reviewed studies.

Herbaceous Plants

Bluet (Houstonia caerulea)

The First Flowering Date is directly related to the average monthly temperatures in January, and the two months prior to flowering. Warmer temperatures in the months leading up to spring leads to earlier flowering.

Source:Ecology article



Bulbous Buttercups (Ranunculus bulbosus)

The First Flowering Date is directly related to the average monthly temperatures in January, and the two months prior to flowering. Warmer temperatures in the months leading up to spring leads to earlier flowering.

Source:Ecology article



Bunchberry (Cornus canadensis)

The First Flowering Date is directly related to the average monthly temperatures in January, and the two months prior to flowering. Warmer temperatures in the months leading up to spring leads to earlier flowering.

Source:Ecology article



Canada Mayflower (Maianthemum canadense)

The First Flowering Date is directly related to the average monthly temperatures in January, and the two months prior to flowering. Warmer temperatures in the months leading up to spring leads to earlier flowering.

Source:Ecology article



Celandine (Chelidonium majus)

The First Flowering Date is directly related to the average monthly temperatures in January, and the two months prior to flowering. Warmer temperatures in the months leading up to spring leads to earlier flowering.

Source:Ecology article



Chicory (Cichorium intybus)

The First Flowering Date is directly related to the average monthly temperatures in January, and the two months prior to flowering. Warmer temperatures in the months leading up to spring leads to earlier flowering.

Source:Ecology article



Common St John's Wort (Hypericum perforatum)

The First Flowering Date is directly related to the average monthly temperatures in January, and the two months prior to flowering. Warmer temperatures in the months leading up to spring leads to earlier flowering.

Source:Ecology article



Cowwheat (Melampyrum lineare)

The First Flowering Date is directly related to the average monthly temperatures in January, and the two months prior to flowering. Warmer temperatures in the months leading up to spring leads to earlier flowering.

Source:Ecology article



Downy Yellow Violet (Viola pubescens)

The First Flowering Date is directly related to the average monthly temperatures in January, and the two months prior to flowering. Warmer temperatures in the months leading up to spring leads to earlier flowering.

Source:Ecology article



Larger Blue Flag (Iris versicolor)

The First Flowering Date is directly related to the average monthly temperatures in January, and the two months prior to flowering. Warmer temperatures in the months leading up to spring leads to earlier flowering.

Source:Ecology article



Leatherleaf (Chamaedaphne caluculata)

The First Flowering Date is directly related to the average monthly temperatures in January, and the two months prior to flowering. Warmer temperatures in the months leading up to spring leads to earlier flowering.

Source:Ecology article



Marsh Blue Violet (Viola cucullata)

The First Flowering Date is directly related to the average monthly temperatures in January, and the two months prior to flowering. Warmer temperatures in the months leading up to spring leads to earlier flowering.

Source:Ecology article



Pink Azalea (Rhododendron nudiflorum)

The First Flowering Date is directly related to the average monthly temperatures in January, and the two months prior to flowering. Warmer temperatures in the months leading up to spring leads to earlier flowering.

Source:Ecology article



Robin's Plantain (Erigeron pulchellus)

The First Flowering Date is directly related to the average monthly temperatures in January, and the two months prior to flowering. Warmer temperatures in the months leading up to spring leads to earlier flowering.

Source:Ecology article



Swamp Candles (Lysimachia terrestris)

The First Flowering Date is directly related to the average monthly temperatures in January, and the two months prior to flowering. Warmer temperatures in the months leading up to spring leads to earlier flowering.

Source:Ecology article



Threeleaf Goldenthread (Coptis trifolia)

Examination of records taken by one naturalist over 32 years (1970-2002) indicates that there is a tie between the timing of spring phenology temperature leading up to spring. Specifically, warmer temperatures in the months leading up to spring leads to earlier flowering.

Source:Wilson Ornithological Society article



Hairy Pinweed (Lechea mucronata)

A comprehensive study of flora in Concord, MA shows a decline in species unable to change flowering time as climate warms rises. Hairy Pinweed is showing a major decline in population correlated with the rise in global and regional temperatures.

Source:Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences



Scarlet Pimpernel (Anagallis arvensis)

A comprehensive study of flora in Concord, MA shows a decline in species unable to change flowering time as climate warms rises. Scarlet Pimpernel is showing a major decline in population correlated with the rise in global and regional temperatures.

Source:Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences



Trees and Shrubs

Highbush Blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum)

The First Flowering Date is directly related to the average monthly temperatures in January, and the two months prior to flowering. Warmer temperatures in the months leading up to spring leads to earlier flowering.

Source:Ecology article

 

 

Late Low Blueberry (Vaccinium vacillans)

The First Flowering Date is directly related to the average monthly temperatures in January, and the two months prior to flowering. Warmer temperatures in the months leading up to spring leads to earlier flowering.

Source:Ecology article

 

 

Privet (Ligustrum vulgare)

The First Flowering Date is directly related to the average monthly temperatures in January, and the two months prior to flowering. Warmer temperatures in the months leading up to spring leads to earlier flowering.

Source:Ecology article

 

 

Shadbush (Amelanchier canadensis)

The First Flowering Date is directly related to the average monthly temperatures in January, and the two months prior to flowering. Warmer temperatures in the months leading up to spring leads to earlier flowering.

Source:Ecology article

 

 

Sugar Maple (Acer Saccharum)

A study published in the journal Global Change Biology indicates that over the course of fourteen years (1989-2002), the duration of the green canopy of the Hubbard Experimental Forest in the White Mountains of New Hampshire, has increased by ten days. This finding includes the Sugar Maple, American Beech, and Yellow Birch.

Additional changes have been observed in the maple sugar industry, and can be found here as reported in news media.

Source:Global Change Biology article

 

 

Yellow Birch (Betula alleghaniensis)

A study published in the journal Global Change Biology indicates that over the course of fourteen years (1989-2002), the duration of the green canopy of the Hubbard Experimental Forest in the White Mountains of New Hampshire, has increased by ten days. This finding includes the Sugar Maple, American Beech, and Yellow Birch.

Source:Global Change Biology Article

 

 

Pale Laurel (Kalmia polifolia)

The First Flowering Date is directly related to the average monthly temperatures in January, and the two months prior to flowering. Warmer temperatures in the months leading up to spring leads to earlier flowering.

Source:Ecology article



American Beech (Fagus grandifolia)

A study published in the journal Global Change Biology indicates that over the course of fourteen years (1989-2002), the duration of the green canopy of the Hubbard Experimental Forest in the White Mountains of New Hampshire, has increased by ten days. This finding includes the Sugar Maple, American Beech, and Yellow Birch.

Source:Global Change Biology Article

 

Marine/Aquatic

Atlantic Cod (Gadus morhua)

NOAA researchers have analyzed annual spring survey data for the northwest Atlantic from 1968-2007, and found that some fish stocks have been moving North and down, seeking colder waters, including the Atlantic Cod in New England's waters.

Source:
ScienceDaily article
Marine Ecology Progress Series article (abstract)

 

 

 

Atlantic marsh fiddler crab (Uca pugnax)

Research at the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) Ecosystems Center indicates that the range of fiddler crabs has moved north by as much as 80km, into the coast of New Hampshire. The link to climate change has not been clearly shown, but it's the leading hypothesis as to why their range has changed.

Source:
Science Daily article
Journal of Crustacean Biology abstract 

 

 

 

Haddock (Melanogrammus aeglefinus)

NOAA researchers have analyzed annual spring survey data for the northwest Atlantic from 1968-2007, and found that some fish stocks have been moving North and down, seeking colder waters, including the Atlantic Cod in New England's waters.

Source:
ScienceDaily article
Marine Ecology Progress Series article (abstract)

 

 

 

Winter Flounder (Psuedopleuronectes americanus)

NOAA researchers have analyzed annual spring survey data for the northwest Atlantic from 1968-2007, and found that some fish stocks have been moving North and down, seeking colder waters, including the Atlantic Cod in New England's waters.

Source:
ScienceDaily article
Marine Ecology Progress Series article (abstract)

 

 

 

Northern Shrimp (Pandalus borealis)

Northern shrimp populations have collapsed, leading to the closure of the Maine shrimp fishery for the year of 2014. A decade of warmer-than-average temperatures has been implicated in the lack of successful reproduction.

Assessment Report for Gulf of Maine Northern Shrimp - 2013

Invertebrates

Aphrodite Fritillary(Speyeria aphrodite)

Systematic surveys show 90% population decline in their Massachusetts range between 1992 and 2010.

Source:
Nature Climate Change article



Atlantis Fritillary (Speyeria atlantis)

Systematic surveys show 90% population decline in their Massachusetts range between 1992 and 2010.

Source:
Nature Climate Change article



Black Swallowtail (Papilio polyxenes)

Observations in Massachusetts show population increase in northern range between 1992 and 2010.

Source:
Nature Climate Change article



Bronze Copper (Lycaena hyllus)

Observations in Massachusetts show population increase in northern range between 1992 and 2010.

Source:
Nature Climate Change article



Common Checkered Skipper (Pyrgus communis)

Observations in Massachusetts show population increase in northern range between 1992 and 2010.

Source:
Nature Climate Change article



Eastern Pine Elfin (Callophrys niphon)

Observations in Massachusetts show population increase in northern range between 1992 and 2010.

Source:
Nature Climate Change article



Fiery Skipper (Hylephia phyleus)

Observations in Massachusetts show population increase in northern range between 1992 and 2010.

Source:
Nature Climate Change article



Frosted Elfin (Callophrys irus)

Systematic surveys show 1000% population increase in their Massachusetts range between 1992 and 2010.

Source:
Nature Climate Change article



Henry's Elfin (Callophrys henrici)

Observations in Massachusetts show population increase in northern range between 1992 and 2010.

Source:
Nature Climate Change article



Ocola Skipper (Panoquina ocola)

Observations in Massachusetts show population increase in northern range between 1992 and 2010.

Source:
Nature Climate Change article



Two-Spotted Skipper (Euphyes bymacula)

Observations in Massachusetts show population increase in northern range between 1992 and 2010.

Source:
Nature Climate Change article



Zabulon Skipper (Poanes zabulon)

Observations in Massachusetts show population increase in northern range between 1992 and 2010.

Source:
Nature Climate Change article



Amphibians

Gray Tree Frog (Hyla versicolor)

Average first spring calling date moved 10.5 days earlier between 1900 and 1999.

Source:
Conservation Biology article



Wood Frog (Rana sylvatica)

Average first spring calling date moved 13.0 days earlier between 1900 and 1999.

Source:
Conservation Biology article



Bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana)

Average first spring calling date moved 11.4 days earlier between 1900 and 1999.

Source:
Conservation Biology article



Spring Peeper (Psuedacris crucifer)

Examination of records taken by one naturalist over 32 years (1970-2002) in Middleborough, MA indicates that there is a tie between the timing of spring phenology and temperature in the months leading up to spring. First calls are heard 3.7 days earlier for every 1 degree Celsius temperature increase in the two months prior.

Between 1900 and 1999, average first calling date has moved 13.6 days earlier.

Source:
Conservation Biology article



Birds

 

Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata)

Researchers analyzed bird capture data from 1970-2002, and found an earlier mean arrival date (average taken from arrival dates of whole recorded population) over time.

Source:
Global Change Biology article



Chipping Sparrow (Spizella passerina)

Examination of records taken by one naturalist over 32 years (1970-2002) in Middleborough, MA indicates that there is a tie between the timing of spring phenology and temperature in months leading up to spring. Spring arrival has been getting earlier as temperatures have increased.

Source:
Wilson Ornithological Society article



Eastern Towhee (Piplo erythrophthalmus)

Researchers analyzed bird capture data from 1970-2002, and found an earlier mean arrival date (average taken from arrival dates of whole recorded population) over time.

Source:
Global Change Biology article



Gray Catbird (Dumetella carolinensis)

Researchers analyzed bird capture data from 1970-2002, and found an earlier mean arrival date (average taken from arrival dates of whole recorded population) over time.

Source:
Global Change Biology article



House Wren (Troglodytes aedon)

Examination of records taken by one naturalist over 32 years (1970-2002) in Middleborough, MA indicates that there is a tie between the timing of spring phenology and temperature in the months leading up to spring. Spring arrival has been getting earlier as temperatures have increased.

Source:
Wilson Ornithological Society article



Magnolia warbler (Dendroica magnolia)

Researchers analyzed bird capture data from 1970-2002, and found an earlier mean arrival date (average taken from arrival dates of whole recorded population) over time.

Source:
Global Change Biology article



Northern Parula (Parula americana)

Researchers analyzed bird capture data from 1970-2002, and found an earlier mean arrival date (average taken from arrival dates of whole recorded population) over time.

Source:
Global Change Biology article



Ovenbird (Seiurus aurocapillus)

Examination of records taken by one naturalist over 32 years (1970-2002) in Middleborough, MA indicates that there is a tie between the timing of spring phenology and temperature in the months leading up to spring. First spring arrival date and the mean spring arrival date (average arrival date taken from the whole recorded population) have both gotten earlier as temperatures have increased.

Bird capture data from 1970-2002 show an earlier mean arrival date (average taken from arrival dates of whole recorded population) over time.

Source:
Wilson Ornithological Society article
Global Change Biology article



Red-winged Blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus)

Examination of records taken by one naturalist over 32 years (1970-2002) in Middleborough, MA indicates that there is a tie between the timing of spring phenology and temperature in the months leading up to spring. For individual years, warmer temperatures in the lead-up to spring correspond directly with an earlier arrival time.

Source:
Wilson Ornithological Society article



Ruby-Throated Hummingbird (Archilochus colubris)

Examination of records taken by one naturalist over 32 years (1970-2002) in Middleborough, MA indicates that there is a tie between the timing of spring phenology and temperature in the months leading up to spring. Spring arrival had moved 18 days earlier compared to 32 years ago by 2002.

Source:
Wilson Ornithological Society article



Swamp Sparrow (Melospiza georgiana)

Researchers analyzed bird capture data from 1970-2002, and found an earlier mean arrival date (average taken from arrival dates of whole recorded population) over time.

Source:
Global Change Biology article



Traill's Flycatcher (Embidonax alnorum and Empidonax traillii)

Researchers analyzed bird capture data from 1970-2002, and found an earlier mean arrival date (average taken from arrival dates of whole recorded population) over time.

Source:
Global Change Biology article



Wood Duck (Aix sponsa)

Examination of records taken by one naturalist over 32 years (1970-2002) indicates that there is a tie between the timing of spring phenology temperature leading up to spring. Spring arrival has advanced by 32.2 days since the beginning of the records. For individual years, warmer temperatures in the lead-up to spring correspond directly with an earlier arrival time.

Source:
Wilson Ornithological Society article



 
 

Mammals

Little Brown Bat (Myotis lucifugus)

Research done in New Hampshire between 1993 and 2008 showed a connection between precipitation and the success of reproduction. If there's more water in the summer, there are more insects, and so a better chance that the offspring will survive.
Source:
Journal of Animal Ecology article