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Curriculum of the week

Title: Off Base
Grade Level: 9-12
Source: NOAA

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Title: Blooming Thermometers
Grade Level: Middle School
Source: National Center for Atmospheric Research

Other curriculum studies

Collaborating to teach the ecology of climate change in New England
When the climate changes, organisms can respond in just a few possible ways: [1]  change their behavior in their current habitats — for example, plants may flower earlier or retain their leaves longer to accommodate a longer growing season, and birds may change their migration times;  [2] change their ranges — for example, the Carolina wren is now commonly seen in New England,…
Over the past few decades, many species have moved into New England from the south, while others have moved within New England, or changed their population numbers.   Earlier posts on this blog have reported some examples, and our species inventory includes some other stories. Birds are probably the most noticeable.  Many people pay attention to them, and there's lots of ways to share news of species sightings, first appearance in the spring, and so forth.…
A new series of resources — Species briefs
 On this website, we maintain a list of all New England species for which there is evidence of climate response, as reported in the scientific literature or in other sources (with links to the sources). (Help us keep up to date! Contact us https://external-wiki.terc.edu/display/BAC/Contact+Us if you see a gap!).   We believe that in teaching about climate change in our region, the stories of individual species can be interesting and even compelling entry points.…

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Case Studies

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Atlantic Cod (Gadus morhua)

Species Study Archives

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Sugar Maple (Acer saccharum)