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{align:center} [!http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/2b/Atlantis_Fritillary%2C_top_view.jpg|width=150px,align=center,title=Photo by D. Gordon E. Robertson,border=1!|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Atlantis_Fritillary,_top_view.jpg] {reveal:id=ID9}{*}Atlantis Fritillary* *_(Speyeria atlantis)_{*}{reveal} {disappear:id=ID9}{panel:borderStyle=solid|borderColor=#13507a|bgColor=#ffffff} The Atlantis Fritillary provides an excellent example of how rapidly things are changing, and how policy is not keeping up. In under two decades, the population of these butterflies in Massachusetts has been reduced by 90%, but they are not listed as in any way threatened, and there are no official conservation plans in place. Historically, the Atlantis Fritillary was one of the most abundant species in the state, but with the rise in temperature, their numbers have been decimated. Source: [Nature Climate Change|http://www.naba.org/chapters/nabambc/downloads/BreedStichterCrone2012.pdf] {panel} {disappear} {align}
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Atlantis Fritillary
(Speyeria atlantis)

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The Atlantis Fritillary provides an excellent example of how rapidly things are changing, and how policy is not keeping up. In under two decades, the population of these butterflies in Massachusetts has been reduced by 90%, but they are not listed as in any way threatened, and there are no official conservation plans in place. Historically, the Atlantis Fritillary was one of the most abundant species in the state, but with the rise in temperature, their numbers have been decimated.

Source:
Nature Climate Change