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TIAN Bundle 4 Articles and References (For Teachers) about Algebraic Thinking

 

  • Driscoll, M. & Moyer, J. (January 2001). Using Students' Work as a Lens on Algebraic Thinking, Mathematics Teaching in the Middle School, 6(5), 282-287.
    This article focuses on the use of student work to help teachers focus on teaching and learning algebra.
  • Kalchman, M.S. (August 2005). Walking through Space: A New Approach for Teaching Functions in Mathematics Teaching in the Middle School, 11(1), 12-17.
    Kalchman shares a real-life scenario for introducing several key aspects of linear functions.
  • Kriegler, S. Just What is Algebraic Thinking?
    Kriegler discusses three lenses for looking at algebra: algebra as abstract arithmetic, algebra as language, and algebra as a tool for the study of functions and mathematical modeling.
  • Mooney, E.S. (March 2007). The Thinking of Students: Cookies, Mathematics Teaching in the Middle School, 12(7), 374-377.
    This brief article gives you insight into students' mathematical thinking about this problem: Tim ate 100 cookies in 5 days. Each day he ate 6 more than the day before. How many cookies did he eat on the first day?
  • Mooney, E.S. (December 2006). The Thinking of Students: Elizabeth's Long Walk, Mathematics Teaching in the Middle School, 12(5), 63-265.
    This brief article gives you insight into students' mathematical thinking about this problem: Elizabeth visits her friend Andrew and then returns home by the same route. She always walks 2 km/h when going uphill, 6 km/h when going downhill, and 3 km/h when on level ground. If her total walking time is 6 hours, then what is the total distance she walks?
  • Peterson, B.E. (November 2006). Counting Dots and Measuring Area: Rich Problems from Japan, Mathematics Teaching in the Middle School, 12(4), 214-219.
    Students look at a set of dots and create a variety of generalizable patterns.
  • Smith, M.S., Hillen, A.F. & Catania, C.L. (August 2007). Using Pattern Tasks to Develop Mathematical Understandings and Set Classroom Norms, Mathematics Teaching in the Middle School, 13(1), 38-44.
    This article discusses the use of pattern blocks to help students develop algebraic reasoning and to establish classroom norms and practices.
  • Thomas, D.A. & Thomas, R.A. (October 1999). Discovery Algebra: Graphing Linear Equations in The Mathematics Teacher, 92(7), 569-572.
    In this article, Thomas shares his personal classroom experience moving toward a new approach to teaching algebra.

Additional Resources

 

Driscoll, Mark. (1999). Fostering Algebraic Thinking: A Guide for Teachers, Grades 6-10. Portsmouth NH: Heinemann.