Science Daily is an excellent resource for keeping up to date in all fields of science. They update regularly, and cover peer-reviewed research in a way that makes it approachable for those of us who aren't scientists without glossing over important details.

The two RSS feeds on this page have a fair amount of overlap, one being about climate in general, the other being about global warming in particular. There are differences in what is covered in each, so we are including both for now, but are also looking into a possible other source of related science news.

Climate News -- ScienceDaily
Climate change and climate prediction. Read science articles on regional climates and global climate shifts. Updated daily.
Geoscientists discover mechanisms controlling Greenland ice sheet collapse
New radar technology allowed geoscientists to look at Greenland's dynamic ice-ocean interface that drives sea level rise.
Sustainable land management key to reducing Amazon wildfires
The unrelenting deforestation of the Amazon region could lead to a dramatic increase to the risk of destructive wildfire outbreaks, research has shown.
Unusually high carbon stocks and tree diversity in Panama's Darien forest
Through a participatory forest-carbon monitoring project in the Darien forest of Panama, scientists and a team of trained indigenous technicians found that, even in disturbed areas, it maintained the same tree species richness and a disproportionately high capacity to sequester carbon.
Strong storms also play big role in Antarctic ice shelf collapse
Warming temperatures and changes in ocean circulation and salinity are driving the breakup of ice sheets in Antarctica, but a new study suggests that intense storms may help push the system over the edge.
Algae-killing viruses spur nutrient recycling in oceans
Scientists have confirmed that viruses can kill marine algae called diatoms and that diatom die-offs near the ocean surface may provide nutrients and organic matter for recycling by other algae, according to a new study.
Climate change to blame for displacement of 55 species in UK
A total of 55 animal species in the UK have been displaced from their natural ranges or enabled to arrive for the first time on UK shores because of climate change over the last 10 years (2008-2018) -- as revealed in a new study.
Rising CO2, climate change projected to reduce availability of nutrients worldwide
The most comprehensive synthesis of climate change impacts on the global availability of nutrients to date finds that, over the next 30 years, climate change and higher CO2 could significantly reduce the availability of critical nutrients, representing another challenge to global development and the fight to end undernutrition.
Modeling predicts blue whales' foraging behavior, aiding population management efforts
Scientists can predict where and when blue whales are most likely to be foraging for food in the California Current Ecosystem, providing new insight that could aid in the management of the endangered population in light of climate change and blue whale mortality due to ship strikes.
Protected area designation effective in reducing, but not preventing, land cover changes
The designation of protected areas in Europe has been effective in reducing, but not completely preventing, land cover changes associated with human activity.
Sea level rise: West Antarctic ice collapse may be prevented by snowing ocean water onto it
Scientists are scrutinizing a daring way of stabilizing the West Antarctic ice sheet: generating trillions of tons of additional snowfall by pumping ocean water onto the glaciers and distributing it with snow canons.
Global Warming News -- ScienceDaily
Global Warming Research. Learn about the causes and effects of global warming. Consider possible global warming solutions. Read predictions of rising sea levels, coral reef bleaching and mass extinctions climate change may cause.
Geoscientists discover mechanisms controlling Greenland ice sheet collapse
New radar technology allowed geoscientists to look at Greenland's dynamic ice-ocean interface that drives sea level rise.
Unusually high carbon stocks and tree diversity in Panama's Darien forest
Through a participatory forest-carbon monitoring project in the Darien forest of Panama, scientists and a team of trained indigenous technicians found that, even in disturbed areas, it maintained the same tree species richness and a disproportionately high capacity to sequester carbon.
Strong storms also play big role in Antarctic ice shelf collapse
Warming temperatures and changes in ocean circulation and salinity are driving the breakup of ice sheets in Antarctica, but a new study suggests that intense storms may help push the system over the edge.
Algae-killing viruses spur nutrient recycling in oceans
Scientists have confirmed that viruses can kill marine algae called diatoms and that diatom die-offs near the ocean surface may provide nutrients and organic matter for recycling by other algae, according to a new study.
Rising CO2, climate change projected to reduce availability of nutrients worldwide
The most comprehensive synthesis of climate change impacts on the global availability of nutrients to date finds that, over the next 30 years, climate change and higher CO2 could significantly reduce the availability of critical nutrients, representing another challenge to global development and the fight to end undernutrition.
Sea level rise: West Antarctic ice collapse may be prevented by snowing ocean water onto it
Scientists are scrutinizing a daring way of stabilizing the West Antarctic ice sheet: generating trillions of tons of additional snowfall by pumping ocean water onto the glaciers and distributing it with snow canons.
Correcting historic sea surface temperature measurements
Why did the oceans warm and cool at such different rates in the early 20th century? New research points to an answer both as mundane as a decimal point truncation and as complicated as global politics. Part history, part climate science, this research corrects decades of data and suggests that ocean warming occurred in a much more homogenous way.
What counts for our climate: Carbon budgets untangled
The more CO2 we emit from burning coal and oil and gas, the more we heat our climate -- this sounds simple, and it is. Different analyzes have come up with different estimates of how much CO2 humankind can still emit if we want to hold global warming to the internationally agreed 1.5 and well below 2 degrees Celsius limits, but a lack of clarity of the reasons causing these variations has created unnecessary confusion, a new study shows.
Tracking down climate change with radar eyes
Over the past 22 years, sea levels in the Arctic have risen an average of 2.2 millimeters per year. This is the conclusion of a research team after evaluating 1.5 billion radar measurements of various satellites using specially developed algorithms.
Joshua trees facing extinction
They outlived mammoths and saber-toothed tigers. But without dramatic action to reduce climate change, new research shows Joshua trees won't survive much past this century.