Science Daily is an excellent resource for keeping up to date in all fields of science. They update regularly, and cover peer-reviewed research in a way that makes it approachable for those of us who aren't scientists without glossing over important details.

The two RSS feeds on this page have a fair amount of overlap, one being about climate in general, the other being about global warming in particular. There are differences in what is covered in each, so we are including both for now, but are also looking into a possible other source of related science news.

Climate News -- ScienceDaily
Climate change and climate prediction. Read science articles on regional climates and global climate shifts. Updated daily.
Climate change has worsened global economic inequality
The gap between the economic output of the world's richest and poorest countries is 25 percent larger today than it would have been without global warming, according to new research.
From coal to gas: How the shift can help stabilize climate change
A transition from coal-based energy to cleaner-burning gas has long been viewed as a staple of many climate action plans, despite concerns over leakage and possible harmful emissions. A recent study finds that not only is such a shift central to meeting climate targets and stabilizing global temperature rise, but that the benefits of cleaner-burning gas outweigh its possible risks.
Fossils found in museum drawer in Kenya belong to gigantic carnivore
Paleontologists have discovered a new species of meat-eating mammal larger than any big cat stalking the world today. Larger than a polar bear, with a skull as large as that of a rhinoceros and enormous piercing canine teeth, this massive carnivore would have been an intimidating part of the eastern African ecosystems occupied by early apes and monkeys.
Green material for refrigeration identified
Researchers have identified an eco-friendly solid that could replace the inefficient and polluting gases used in most refrigerators and air conditioners.
How bacteria build an enzyme that destroys climate-changing laughing gas
New research reveals how soil bacteria build the only known enzyme for the destruction of the potent global warming and ozone-depleting gas nitrous oxide. Alongside carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane, the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O), commonly known as 'laughing gas', is now a cause for great concern, and there is much international focus on reducing emissions. It is hoped that the findings will help pave the way for strategies to mitigate the damaging effects of N2O.
New eDNA technology used to quickly assess coral reefs
Scientists have developed a technique for measuring the amount of living coral on a reef by analyzing DNA in small samples of seawater.
Balancing the ocean carbon budget
How exactly does the ocean -- the Earth's largest carbon sink -- capture and store carbon? The answer to this question will become increasingly important as the planet warms and as we try to get ahead of a runaway climate scenario.
Neotropical cloud forests to lose what most defines them: Clouds
In as few as 25 years, climate change could shrink and dry 60-80% of Western Hemisphere cloud forests, finds a study published today. If greenhouse gas emissions continue increasing as they have been, 90% of Western Hemisphere cloud forests would be affected as early as 2060. The current cloud and frost environment of the highly diverse alpine ecosystems above these equatorial cloud forests, known as páramo, will nearly disappear.
Solution to riddle of ocean carbon storage
Research by a team of the world's leading oceanographers has proposed a new explanation for how the ocean absorbs and stores carbon, solving a riddle that has long puzzled scientists. It's well established that carbon in the atmosphere is absorbed by phytoplankton and transported to the ocean floor as the microscopic organisms die and sink by gravity through the water.
Plants and microbes shape global biomes through local underground alliances
Researchers report that the distribution of forest types worldwide is based on the relationships plant species forged with soil microbes to enhance their uptake of nutrients. These symbioses could help scientists understand how ecosystems may shift as climate change alters the interplay between plants, microbes and soil.
Global Warming News -- ScienceDaily
Global Warming Research. Learn about the causes and effects of global warming. Consider possible global warming solutions. Read predictions of rising sea levels, coral reef bleaching and mass extinctions climate change may cause.
Climate change has worsened global economic inequality
The gap between the economic output of the world's richest and poorest countries is 25 percent larger today than it would have been without global warming, according to new research.
From coal to gas: How the shift can help stabilize climate change
A transition from coal-based energy to cleaner-burning gas has long been viewed as a staple of many climate action plans, despite concerns over leakage and possible harmful emissions. A recent study finds that not only is such a shift central to meeting climate targets and stabilizing global temperature rise, but that the benefits of cleaner-burning gas outweigh its possible risks.
Ocean currents bring good news for reef fish
A new study suggests reefs suffering coral bleaching can still be productive, as fish dependent on reefs get a bulk of their food delivered via the currents flowing past.
Green material for refrigeration identified
Researchers have identified an eco-friendly solid that could replace the inefficient and polluting gases used in most refrigerators and air conditioners.
How bacteria build an enzyme that destroys climate-changing laughing gas
New research reveals how soil bacteria build the only known enzyme for the destruction of the potent global warming and ozone-depleting gas nitrous oxide. Alongside carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane, the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O), commonly known as 'laughing gas', is now a cause for great concern, and there is much international focus on reducing emissions. It is hoped that the findings will help pave the way for strategies to mitigate the damaging effects of N2O.
Balancing the ocean carbon budget
How exactly does the ocean -- the Earth's largest carbon sink -- capture and store carbon? The answer to this question will become increasingly important as the planet warms and as we try to get ahead of a runaway climate scenario.
Neotropical cloud forests to lose what most defines them: Clouds
In as few as 25 years, climate change could shrink and dry 60-80% of Western Hemisphere cloud forests, finds a study published today. If greenhouse gas emissions continue increasing as they have been, 90% of Western Hemisphere cloud forests would be affected as early as 2060. The current cloud and frost environment of the highly diverse alpine ecosystems above these equatorial cloud forests, known as páramo, will nearly disappear.
Solution to riddle of ocean carbon storage
Research by a team of the world's leading oceanographers has proposed a new explanation for how the ocean absorbs and stores carbon, solving a riddle that has long puzzled scientists. It's well established that carbon in the atmosphere is absorbed by phytoplankton and transported to the ocean floor as the microscopic organisms die and sink by gravity through the water.
Small fossils with big applications: BP Gulf of Mexico time scale
Geologic time scales are critical to understanding the timing, duration, and connection of geologic events. They are not static, and can be improved with research, integration, and refinements realized from biostratigraphic repetitive analysis. Over the past century they have proven important tools in petroleum exploration and studies of climatic and geologic events. Still, many geologists may not know the importance of microfossils to the construction of time scales and biostratigraphy.
NASA study verifies global warming trends
A new study has verified the accuracy of recent global warming figures. The team used measurements of the 'skin' temperature of the Earth taken by a satellite-based infrared measurement system called AIRS (Atmospheric Infra-Red Sounder) from 2003 to 2017. They compared these with station-based analyses of surface air temperature anomalies.