Science Daily is an excellent resource for keeping up to date in all fields of science. They update regularly, and cover peer-reviewed research in a way that makes it approachable for those of us who aren't scientists without glossing over important details.

The two RSS feeds on this page have a fair amount of overlap, one being about climate in general, the other being about global warming in particular. There are differences in what is covered in each, so we are including both for now, but are also looking into a possible other source of related science news.

Climate News -- ScienceDaily
Climate change and climate prediction. Read science articles on regional climates and global climate shifts. Updated daily.
Small volcanic lakes tapping giant underground reservoirs
In its large caldera, Newberry volcano (Oregon, USA) has two small volcanic lakes, one fed by volcanic geothermal fluids (Paulina Lake) and one by gases (East Lake). These popular fishing grounds are small windows into a large underlying reservoir of hydrothermal fluids, releasing carbon dioxide (CO2) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) with minor mercury (Hg) and methane into East Lake.
'Falling insect' season length impacts river ecosystems
Insects that fall from the surrounding forest provide seasonal food for fish in streams. Researchers have shown that the lengthening of this period has a profound effect on stream food webs and ecosystem functions. These research results provide proof that changes in forest seasonality also affect the ecosystems of nearby rivers. This finding also highlights the importance of predicting the effects of climate change.
Antarctic seals reveal worrying threats to disappearing glaciers
More Antarctic meltwater is surfacing than was previously known, modifying the climate, preventing sea ice from forming and boosting marine productivity- according to new research. For the first time, researchers have been able to obtain full-depth glacial meltwater observations in winter, using instruments attached to the heads of seals living near the Pine Island Glacier, in the remote Amundsen Sea in the west of Antarctica.
The collapse of Northern California kelp forests will be hard to reverse
Satellite imagery shows that the area covered by kelp forests off the coast of Northern California has dropped by more than 95 percent, with just a few small, isolated patches of bull kelp remaining. Species-rich kelp forests have been replaced by 'urchin barrens,' where purple sea urchins cover a seafloor devoid of kelp and other algae. A new study documents this dramatic shift in the coastal ecosystem and analyzes the events that caused it.
Fine particulate matter from wildfire smoke more harmful than pollution from other sources
Researchers examining 14 years of hospital admissions data conclude that the fine particles in wildfire smoke can be several times more harmful to human respiratory health than particulate matter from other sources such as car exhaust. While this distinction has been previously identified in laboratory experiments, the new study confirms it at the population level.
Apparent Atlantic warming cycle likely an artifact of climate forcing
Volcanic eruptions, not natural variability, were the cause of an apparent 'Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation,' a purported cycle of warming thought to have occurred on a timescale of 40 to 60 years during the pre-industrial era, according to a team of climate scientists who looked at a large array of climate modeling experiments.
Field study shows icing can cost wind turbines up to 80% of power production
Researchers took their studies of wind-turbine icing out of the lab and into the field to learn how and where ice accumulates on rotating blades. They learned ice on the blades can reduce power production by up to 80%. The field experiments also validated their experimental findings, theories and predictions.
Dramatic decline in western butterfly populations linked to fall warming
Western butterfly populations are declining at an estimated rate of 1.6% per year, according to a new report. The report looks at more than 450 butterfly species, including the western monarch, whose latest population count revealed a 99.9% decline since the 1980s.
Will climate change outpace species adaptation?
Many species might be left vulnerable in the face of climate change, unable to adapt their physiologies to respond to rapid global warming. According to a team of international researchers, species evolve heat tolerance more slowly than cold tolerance, and the level of heat they can adapt to has limits.
Volcanoes might light up the night sky of this planet
Until now, researchers have found no evidence of global tectonic activity on planets outside our solar system. Scientists have now found that the material inside planet LHS 3844b flows from one hemisphere to the other and could be responsible for numerous volcanic eruptions on one side of the planet.
Global Warming News -- ScienceDaily
Global Warming Research. Learn about the causes and effects of global warming. Consider possible global warming solutions. Read predictions of rising sea levels, coral reef bleaching and mass extinctions climate change may cause.
Small volcanic lakes tapping giant underground reservoirs
In its large caldera, Newberry volcano (Oregon, USA) has two small volcanic lakes, one fed by volcanic geothermal fluids (Paulina Lake) and one by gases (East Lake). These popular fishing grounds are small windows into a large underlying reservoir of hydrothermal fluids, releasing carbon dioxide (CO2) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) with minor mercury (Hg) and methane into East Lake.
Antarctic seals reveal worrying threats to disappearing glaciers
More Antarctic meltwater is surfacing than was previously known, modifying the climate, preventing sea ice from forming and boosting marine productivity- according to new research. For the first time, researchers have been able to obtain full-depth glacial meltwater observations in winter, using instruments attached to the heads of seals living near the Pine Island Glacier, in the remote Amundsen Sea in the west of Antarctica.
The collapse of Northern California kelp forests will be hard to reverse
Satellite imagery shows that the area covered by kelp forests off the coast of Northern California has dropped by more than 95 percent, with just a few small, isolated patches of bull kelp remaining. Species-rich kelp forests have been replaced by 'urchin barrens,' where purple sea urchins cover a seafloor devoid of kelp and other algae. A new study documents this dramatic shift in the coastal ecosystem and analyzes the events that caused it.
Apparent Atlantic warming cycle likely an artifact of climate forcing
Volcanic eruptions, not natural variability, were the cause of an apparent 'Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation,' a purported cycle of warming thought to have occurred on a timescale of 40 to 60 years during the pre-industrial era, according to a team of climate scientists who looked at a large array of climate modeling experiments.
Field study shows icing can cost wind turbines up to 80% of power production
Researchers took their studies of wind-turbine icing out of the lab and into the field to learn how and where ice accumulates on rotating blades. They learned ice on the blades can reduce power production by up to 80%. The field experiments also validated their experimental findings, theories and predictions.
Dramatic decline in western butterfly populations linked to fall warming
Western butterfly populations are declining at an estimated rate of 1.6% per year, according to a new report. The report looks at more than 450 butterfly species, including the western monarch, whose latest population count revealed a 99.9% decline since the 1980s.
Will climate change outpace species adaptation?
Many species might be left vulnerable in the face of climate change, unable to adapt their physiologies to respond to rapid global warming. According to a team of international researchers, species evolve heat tolerance more slowly than cold tolerance, and the level of heat they can adapt to has limits.
Want to cut emissions that cause climate change? Tax carbon
Putting a price on producing carbon is the cheapest, most efficient policy change legislators can make to reduce emissions that cause climate change, new research suggests.
NASA's ICESat-2 satellite reveals shape, depth of Antarctic ice shelf fractures
When a block of ice the size of Houston, Texas, broke off from East Antarctica's Amery Ice Shelf in 2019, scientists had anticipated the calving event, but not exactly where it would happen. Now, satellite data can help scientists measure the depth and shape of ice shelf fractures to better predict when and where calving events will occur, according to researchers.
Gender assumptions harm progress on climate adaption and resilience
Outdated assumptions around gender continue to hinder effective and fair policymaking and action for climate mitigation and adaptation, experts say in a new article.