Plant species showing evidence of climate change impacts

American Beech (Fagus grandifolia)

A study published in the journal Global Change Biology indicates that over the course of fourteen years (1989-2002), the duration of the green canopy of the Hubbard Experimental Forest in the White Mountains of New Hampshire, has increased by ten days. This finding includes the Sugar Maple, American Beech, and Yellow Birch.

Source:Global Change Biology Article

Bluet (Houstonia caerulea)

The First Flowering Date is directly related to the average monthly temperatures in January, and the two months prior to flowering. Warmer temperatures in the months leading up to spring leads to earlier flowering.

Source:Ecology article

Bulbous Buttercups (Ranunculus bulbosus)

The First Flowering Date is directly related to the average monthly temperatures in January, and the two months prior to flowering. Warmer temperatures in the months leading up to spring leads to earlier flowering.

Source:Ecology article

Bunchberry (Cornus canadensis)

The First Flowering Date is directly related to the average monthly temperatures in January, and the two months prior to flowering. Warmer temperatures in the months leading up to spring leads to earlier flowering.

Source:Ecology article

Canada Mayflower (Maianthemum canadense)

The First Flowering Date is directly related to the average monthly temperatures in January, and the two months prior to flowering. Warmer temperatures in the months leading up to spring leads to earlier flowering.

Source:Ecology article

Celandine (Chelidonium majus)

The First Flowering Date is directly related to the average monthly temperatures in January, and the two months prior to flowering. Warmer temperatures in the months leading up to spring leads to earlier flowering.

Source:Ecology article

Chicory (Cichorium intybus)

The First Flowering Date is directly related to the average monthly temperatures in January, and the two months prior to flowering. Warmer temperatures in the months leading up to spring leads to earlier flowering.

Source:Ecology article

Common St John's Wort (Hypericum perforatum)

The First Flowering Date is directly related to the average monthly temperatures in January, and the two months prior to flowering. Warmer temperatures in the months leading up to spring leads to earlier flowering.

Source:Ecology article

Cowwheat (Melampyrum lineare)

The First Flowering Date is directly related to the average monthly temperatures in January, and the two months prior to flowering. Warmer temperatures in the months leading up to spring leads to earlier flowering.

Source:Ecology article

Downy Yellow Violet (Viola pubescens)

The First Flowering Date is directly related to the average monthly temperatures in January, and the two months prior to flowering. Warmer temperatures in the months leading up to spring leads to earlier flowering.

Source:Ecology article

Highbush Blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum)

The First Flowering Date is directly related to the average monthly temperatures in January, and the two months prior to flowering. Warmer temperatures in the months leading up to spring leads to earlier flowering.

Source:Ecology article

Larger Blue Flag (Iris versicolor)

The First Flowering Date is directly related to the average monthly temperatures in January, and the two months prior to flowering. Warmer temperatures in the months leading up to spring leads to earlier flowering.

Source:Ecology article

Late Low Blueberry (Vaccinium vacillans)

The First Flowering Date is directly related to the average monthly temperatures in January, and the two months prior to flowering. Warmer temperatures in the months leading up to spring leads to earlier flowering.

Source:Ecology article

Leatherleaf (Chamaedaphne caluculata)

The First Flowering Date is directly related to the average monthly temperatures in January, and the two months prior to flowering. Warmer temperatures in the months leading up to spring leads to earlier flowering.

Source:Ecology article

Marsh Blue Violet (Viola cucullata)

The First Flowering Date is directly related to the average monthly temperatures in January, and the two months prior to flowering. Warmer temperatures in the months leading up to spring leads to earlier flowering.

Source:Ecology article

Pale Laurel (Kalmia polifolia)

The First Flowering Date is directly related to the average monthly temperatures in January, and the two months prior to flowering. Warmer temperatures in the months leading up to spring leads to earlier flowering.

Source:Ecology article

Pink Azalea (Rhododendron nudiflorum)

The First Flowering Date is directly related to the average monthly temperatures in January, and the two months prior to flowering. Warmer temperatures in the months leading up to spring leads to earlier flowering.

Source:Ecology article

Privet (Ligustrum vulgare)

The First Flowering Date is directly related to the average monthly temperatures in January, and the two months prior to flowering. Warmer temperatures in the months leading up to spring leads to earlier flowering.

Source:Ecology article

Robin's Plantain (Erigeron pulchellus)

The First Flowering Date is directly related to the average monthly temperatures in January, and the two months prior to flowering. Warmer temperatures in the months leading up to spring leads to earlier flowering.

Source:Ecology article

Shadbush (Amelanchier canadensis)

The First Flowering Date is directly related to the average monthly temperatures in January, and the two months prior to flowering. Warmer temperatures in the months leading up to spring leads to earlier flowering.

Source:Ecology article

Sugar Maple (Acer Saccharum)

The maple sugar industry is suffering because of the fluctuations in seasonal temperature patterns. While the surface impacts of this are on the sugar farmers, it is clear that there is also a change in the physiological patterns of the trees, since it's their reaction to temperature that enables the maple sugar industry to function.

In addition, a study published in the journal Global Change Biology indicates that over the course of fourteen years (1989-2002), the duration of the green canopy of the Hubbard Experimental Forest in the White Mountains of New Hampshire, has increased by ten days. This finding includes the Sugar Maple, American Beech, and Yellow Birch.

Source:
New York Times article
Daily Climate article
Global Change Biology article

Swamp Candles (Lysimachia terrestris)

The First Flowering Date is directly related to the average monthly temperatures in January, and the two months prior to flowering. Warmer temperatures in the months leading up to spring leads to earlier flowering.

Source:Ecology article

Threeleaf Goldenthread (Coptis trifolia)

Examination of records taken by one naturalist over 32 years (1970-2002) indicates that there is a tie between the timing of spring phenology temperature leading up to spring. Specifically, warmer temperatures in the months leading up to spring leads to earlier flowering.

Source:Wilson Ornithological Society article

Yellow Birch (Betula alleghaniensis)

A study published in the journal Global Change Biology indicates that over the course of fourteen years (1989-2002), the duration of the green canopy of the Hubbard Experimental Forest in the White Mountains of New Hampshire, has increased by ten days. This finding includes the Sugar Maple, American Beech, and Yellow Birch.

Source:Global Change Biology Article