h4. Animal species showing evidence of climate change impacts

Atlantic Cod (Gadus morhua)

NOAA researchers have analyzed annual spring survey data for the northwest Atlantic from 1968-2007, and found that some fish stocks have been moving North and down, seeking colder waters, including the Atlantic Cod in New England's waters.

Source:
ScienceDaily article
Marine Ecology Progress Series article (abstract)

Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata)

Researchers analyzed bird capture data from 1970-2002, and found an earlier mean arrival date (average taken from arrival dates of whole recorded population) over time.

Source:
Global Change Biology article

Chipping Sparrow (Spizella passerina)

Examination of records taken by one naturalist over 32 years (1970-2002) in Middleborough, MA indicates that there is a tie between the timing of spring phenology temperature leading up to spring. Spring arrival has been getting earlier.

Source:
Wilson Ornithological Society article

Eastern Towhee (Piplo erythrophthalmus)

Researchers analyzed bird capture data from 1970-2002, and found an earlier mean arrival date (average taken from arrival dates of whole recorded population) over time.

Source:
Global Change Biology article

Gray Catbird (Dumetella carolinensis)

Researchers analyzed bird capture data from 1970-2002, and found an earlier mean arrival date (average taken from arrival dates of whole recorded population) over time.

Source:
Global Change Biology article

Haddock (Melanogrammus aeglefinus)

NOAA researchers have analyzed annual spring survey data for the northwest Atlantic from 1968-2007, and found that some fish stocks have been moving North and down, seeking colder waters, including the Atlantic Cod in New England's waters.

Source:
ScienceDaily article
Marine Ecology Progress Series article (abstract)

House Wren (Troglodytes aedon)

Examination of records taken by one naturalist over 32 years (1970-2002) in Middleborough, MA indicates that there is a tie between the timing of spring phenology temperature leading up to spring. Spring arrival has been getting earlier.

Source:
Wilson Ornithological Society article

Little Brown Bat (Myotis lucifugus)

Research done in New Hampshire between 1993 and 2008 showed a connection between precipitation and the success of reproduction. If there's more water in the summer, there are more insects, and so a better chance that the offspring will survive.
Source:
Journal of Animal Ecology article

Magnolia warbler (Dendroica magnolia)

Researchers analyzed bird capture data from 1970-2002, and found an earlier mean arrival date (average taken from arrival dates of whole recorded population) over time.

Source:
Global Change Biology article

Northern Parula (Parula americana)

Researchers analyzed bird capture data from 1970-2002, and found an earlier mean arrival date (average taken from arrival dates of whole recorded population) over time.

Source:
Global Change Biology article

Ovenbird (Seiurus aurocapillus)

Examination of records taken by one naturalist over 32 years (1970-2002) in Middleborough, MA indicates that there is a tie between the timing of spring phenology temperature leading up to spring. First spring arrival date and the mean spring arrival date (average arrival date taken from the whole recorded population) have both gotten earlier.

Earlier spring arrival. Earlier mean arrival date.

Source:
Wilson Ornithological Society article
Global Change Biology article

Red-winged Blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus)

Examination of records taken by one naturalist over 32 years (1970-2002) in Middleborough, MA indicates that there is a tie between the timing of spring phenology temperature leading up to spring. For individual years, warmer temperatures in the lead-up to spring correspond directly with an earlier arrival time.

Source:
Wilson Ornithological Society article

Ruby-Throated Hummingbird (Archilochus colubris)

Examination of records taken by one naturalist over 32 years (1970-2002) in Middleborough, MA indicates that there is a tie between the timing of spring phenology temperature leading up to spring. Spring arrival had moved 18 days earlier compared to 32 years ago by 2002.

Source:
Wilson Ornithological Society article

Spring Peeper (Psuedacris crucifer)

Examination of records taken by one naturalist over 32 years (1970-2002) in Middleborough, MA indicates that there is a tie between the timing of spring phenology temperature leading up to spring. First calls are heard 3.7 days earlier for every 1 degree Celsius temperature increase in the two months prior.

Source:
Wilson Ornithological Society article

Swamp Sparrow (Melospiza georgiana)

Researchers analyzed bird capture data from 1970-2002, and found an earlier mean arrival date (average taken from arrival dates of whole recorded population) over time.

Source:
Global Change Biology article

Traill's Flycatcher (Embidonax alnorum and Empidonax traillii)

Researchers analyzed bird capture data from 1970-2002, and found an earlier mean arrival date (average taken from arrival dates of whole recorded population) over time.

Source:
Global Change Biology article

Winter Flounder (Psuedopleuronectes americanus)

NOAA researchers have analyzed annual spring survey data for the northwest Atlantic from 1968-2007, and found that some fish stocks have been moving North and down, seeking colder waters, including the Atlantic Cod in New England's waters.

Source:
ScienceDaily article
Marine Ecology Progress Series article (abstract)

Wood Duck (Aix sponsa)

Examination of records taken by one naturalist over 32 years (1970-2002) indicates that there is a tie between the timing of spring phenology temperature leading up to spring. Spring arrival has advanced by 32.2 days since the beginning of the records. For individual years, warmer temperatures in the lead-up to spring correspond directly with an earlier arrival time.

Source:
Wilson Ornithological Society article